War Horse review

Among the many themes that emerge or converge in the films of director, producer, writer Steven Spielberg are lonely children and war, specifically World War II. From the kids in “E.T”: the Extra-Terrestrial” (1982) to the Oscar-winning “Schindler’s List” (1993),  a black and white film but viewers may remember the little Jewish girl in a red coat, waiting for transport to the Nazi death camps. And from “The Color Purple” (1985) for which he deserved an Oscar, to one of my personal favorite’s, this year’s “Super 8”, Spielberg captures lonely children, or children estranged from, or in tension with, their fathers, as none other.

Saving Private Ryan” (1998), and the TV miniseries “Band of Brothers” (2001) and “Pacific” (2010) and back to cinema with “Letters from Iwo Jima” (2006), Spielberg draws the heartbreak of war with the pen of cinematic art as few others, perhaps none other. But I think with “War Horse”, opening in theaters on Christmas Day, is Spielberg’s take on the Academy Award winning 2009 film “The Hurtlocker”, his chance to show how war shreds humanity through the desperate courage and pain of a war horse.

“War Horse” is based on based on a 1982 children’s novel by Michael Marpurgo and has been made into a stage play in 2007 that friends have told me is extremely moving. It is estimated that millions of horses died in World War I from all the armies involved.

A few months before England declared war on Germany in 1914, a horse is born in Devon. Albert Narracott (Jeremy Divine), the only son and of  tenant farmers Ted (Peter Mullan) and Rose (Emily Watson). Ted goes to market to buy a workhorse, presumably a Clydesdale, but is enthralled with the strength and beauty of Joey. He spends money he does not have and takes the horse home, to the derision and disapproval of all except Albert.

Joey proves his worth by plowing an impossibly rocky field but the crop is lost in a rainstorm. When war is declared, soldiers come to the village to buy horses, and an officer promises Albert he will bring Joey home safe if he can.

Joey heads into war with the British soldiers, is lost to the Germans, taken in by a French farmer and his granddaughter but eventually ends up working the German transport lines with Topthorn, a black stallion also captured from the British army.

As the longest, most deadly war in history nears the end, Joey escapes from his cruel masters (though some wranglers were good to the horses) and in a heartbreaking sequence, wrapped in barbed wire, cut and bleeding, makes a run for it through no-mans-land. This is the films’ finest, most poignant, terrifying scene, that culminates with Germans and British units recognizing the transcendent strength of this noble steed, and changing them all, just for a moment.

There are elements of the film that won’t pass muster to the careful viewer. The crop that gets ruined is on a slope; my sister, who has a large garden, said the rain would have run off, not drowned the vegetables.  The crookedly plowed field turns into the perfectly furrowed plot from one scene to another. Albert, who eventually is old enough to go to war, is blinded by gas and then all of a sudden he can see but the audience does not get to see that moment. I wanted to see this because the characters were not well developed; the one with the most interesting potential was Rose, played by Emily Watson.

The film has been nominated for many awards for cinematography, that magical craft of bringing light and camera together, by Janusz Kaminski. Kaminski has worked on many Spielberg movies, winning Oscars for “Schindler’s List” and “Saving Private Ryan”.  But I found the digital color “filming” to be over saturated making the characters seem almost as if they were motion-capture animation. Some of the staging of the scenes seemed to have been lifted right out of “Gone with the Wind” and “The Searchers”.

I think the dissonance I am feeling about the film is the extravagant production quality in 3D vis-à-vis a story that was more simple (as in less complex) than the huge production called for.

In the end, “War Horse” is about war and it is about the ways that animals can teach us to be more human. It’s too long, but it is inspiring. The horses, several were used for both Joey and Topthorn, will astonish you.

Everything in the film is true, and some of it did happen.

 

Sister Rose YouTube Channel

A few weeks ago I began reviewing current films for American Catholic.org

It is the online, continually updated version of St. Anthony Messenger.

I am also doing a weekly “Faith & Media: segment for American Catholic Radio on the Franciscan Media site

Stop by and visit!!

Here’s my review of the new Harry Potter film.

To subscribe to these weekly updates, visit http://www.Youtube.com/sisterroseACO

 

City of Angels Film Festival March 12-14 Directors Guild of America, Los Angeles

Check out the film slate at The City of Angels Film Festival

There will also be an alternative track

Founder’s Forays into Film

Saturday, March 13

hosted by the City of Angels Film Festival co-founder, Scott D. Young.

Theater 3, Directors Guild of America

1 pm FOR THE LOVE OF MOVIES Director, Gerald Peary

Documentary on the (melo)dramatic story of film criticism

“a fascinating look at the vibrant personalities who changed the way we look at film”  Chris Gore

Screening followed by panel discussion: “Writing On Film”

Panel Moderator: Scott Young

Panelists: Claudia Puig, USA Today film critic, Scott D. Young, and Sr Rose Pacatte, FSP, film journalist and author

3:30 pm BEST FILM RESTORATION OF DECADE

KILLER OF SHEEP  Director, Charles Burnett

Considered one of the finest student films ever produced. Selected as one of the 100 Essential Films by the National Society of Film Critics.

“an American masterpiece,independent to the bone”   Manohla Dargis, New York Times

Post-screening discussion: Scott Young

7:00 pm  BEST FILM OF THE DECADE

MULHOLLAND DRIVE  Director, David Lynch

Voted Best Film of the Decade by Film Comment (survey of 100 international moviemakers/critics/academics)

“Hypnotic”  Roger Ebert         “A Maniacal Thrill”  New York Times

Post-screening discussion: Scott Young

Zero Gravity & God’s Call: Sister Rose’s 42nd anniversary as a Daughter of St. Paul today!

 Anniversary pic

 Yes, 42 years ago, on August 5th, a Saturday and the feast of Our Lady of the Snows (now called the commemoration of St. Mary Major), I flew from San Diego via American Airlines to JFK, stayed in the terminal for a few hours because of a thunderstorm (had supper with my Uncle Richard who my mom alerted) and then onto Boston. We (Sr. Mary Thecla and another aspirant) arrived very late. If you can believe it, Mother Paula and two other sisters met us on the tarmac (before the days of jetways). The late-night drive through the Callahan tunnel terrified me. Luckily, that didn’t last.

What a gift the Pauline vocation is for me and for all members of the Pauline family of congregations founded by Bl. James Alberione.

I want to thank every person who has supported and influenced me in these years. Join me in praying that young women will continue to hear the call to follow Christ more closely in religious life – especially in the congregations of the Pauline Family.

Bless you all and thank you, Jesus.

What a ride this has been.

I just updated my blog  on the National Catholic Reporter blog with my vocation story: Zero Gravity & God’s Grace

My friend Evy Nelson sent me this image for my anniversary today; thank you, Evy! What fun!

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