Sister Rose’s blog reaches 500,000 hits today

Since I moved my blog to WordPress on October 5, 2008 I never dreamed of 500.000 hits or page views. In this day of YouTube videos getting a million hits in a day or an hour, this half million in three years eight months, an average of 300 hits a day with 2,900 in one day in 2010, does not seem like much in the virtual scheme of things. Yet it provides me with a motive of thanksgiving for the Internet and the gift of communication between God’s people the world over and who knows? Maybe the universe. (We don’t know who might be listening, do we?)

WordPress sent me an analysis of that best day: March 9, 2010

Thank you for your visit, your time, your interest. Be assured of my prayers.

 

“The Way” Special screening and panel UCLA May 31, 2012

Apocalyptic Themes in Cinema

Click here  to view the presentation I gave last night at St. Monica’s Parish in Santa Monica, CA. The film clips are missing but the list of the films I referenced are in the last slide. (Thanks to Mary Sperry; she’ll know!)

Catholics in Media Awards: honorees announced

19th Annual Catholics in Media Awards

c/o Catholics in Media Associates

12400 Ventura Blvd. PMB 228

Studio City, CA 91604

818.907.2734

www.catholicsinmedia.org

catholicsinmedia@aol.com

19th Catholics in Media Awards to Hugo, Modern Family, I Am & The Way at April 29th Awards Program


“Bold and Beautiful” Star John McCook to MC

Ubiquity Pictures CEO Barbara M. Gangi is

Honorary Chairperson

 (Los Angeles, CA, April 2, 2012) – The Catholics in Media Associates (CIMA) 19th Annual Mass and Awards Brunch on Sunday, April 29th will honor the 5-time Academy Award-winning, Martin Scorsese-directed family film Hugo, the Tom Shadyac documentary I Am and ABC Television’s Emmy, Golden Globe, Screen Actors Guild and Peabody Award-winning series Modern Family.  The Emilio Estevez film The Way, starring Martin Sheen, a previous CIMA Lifetime Achievement Award winner, will receive the CIMA 2012 Board of Directors Award. The 2012 CIMA Awards at theBeverly Hills Hotel, Beverly Hills, CA, will begin with a 10:00 AM Mass with a brunch and awards ceremony to follow, announced CIMA President Haskell V. Anderson III. CIMA board member John Kelly is executive producer and CIMA Vice President Nancy Norton Bevins  is producer of the 2012 CIMA Awards program. Master of Ceremonies is John McCook, Emmy-nominated star of “The Bold and the Beautiful.”  Honorary Chairperson is Barbara M. Gangi, CEO ofUbiquity Pictures.

The CIMA Awards were created in 1992 by former DGA President Jack Shea and his wife, veteran television screenwriterPatt Shea and other prominent Catholics in the entertainment industry. Their purpose is “To promote and applaud individuals, films and TV programs that uplift the spirit and help us better understand what it is to be part of the human family.”

The CIMA 2012 Film Award will be given to the Martin Scorsese film Hugo, Scorsese’s first 3D film, a family mystery based upon the Brian Selznick novel about a boy who lives alone in a Paris railroad station and the enigmatic owner of a toy shop.  Winner of five Academy Awards and named “Best Picture” by the 2012 National Board of Review  Hugo has received two 2012 BATFA Awards and the 2012 Golden Globe for “Best Director.” Graham King’s GK Films and Johnny Depp’s Infinitum Nihil are producers. David Crockett, Barbara De Fina, Christi Dembrowski, George Kacandes, Charles Newirth and Emma Tillinger are executive producers.  Hugo was released nationally on DVD on February 28th.

The 2012 CIMA Television Award will be presented to the ABC Television series Modern Family, created by Executive Producers Christopher Lloyd and Steven Levitan and revolving around three families interrelated thru patriarch Jay Pritchett (Ed O’Neill).  Modern Family has received the 2009 Peabody Award, the 2010 Emmy Award for “Outstanding Comedy Series,” the 2010 Screen Actors Guild Award for “Outstanding Ensemble Performance” and the 2012 Golden Globe Award for “Outstanding Television Series – Musical or Comedy.” 

 The CIMA 2012 Documentary Award goes to I Am, written, directed and narrated by prolific Hollywood film and television comedy director Tom Shadyac (Bruce Almighty, Liar Liar, Ace Ventura, The Nutty Professor) relating his personal experiences and personal journey following a devastating 2007 bicycle accident.  I am is concerned with “The nature of humanity and the world’s ever growing addiction to materialism” and asks the questions “What’s wrong with the world?” and “What can I do about it?”  Jennifer Abbott and Jonathan Watson are executive producers.

 The CIMA 2012 Board of Directors Award goes to the Emilio Estevez film The Way, starring previous CIMA Lifetime Achievement Award winner Martin SheenThe Way is a powerful and inspirational story about family and friends and navigating the challenges of an ever-changing and complicated world.

 Filmed on location in Spain and France along “The Way of St. James,” The Way was written and directed by Emilio Estevez. Trevor Drinkwater, Ramon Gerard Estevez, Alberto Marini, Janet Sheen and John Sloss are executive producers.The Way was released nationally on DVD on February 21st

 ABOUT CIMA

 

CIMA was formed in 1992 by working professionals in the entertainment industry to help them relate their faith to their professional lives.  Through their annual awards, CIMA “Recognizes films, television programs and other entertainment forms that lift the spirit and help us better understand what it is to be part of the human family.”

For 2012 CIMA Award tickets, sponsorship and program advertising visit www.catholicsinmedia.org or call 818.907.2734.

Press Contact:   

Frank Tobin

Frank Tobin PR

323.661.3720

fxtobin@aol.com

www.franktobinpr.com

Jesus at the Movies

 

 

 

Movies featuring the life of Jesus have been around almost since the beginning of cinema. The first narrative film about his life was a series of shorts edited by Lucien Nonguet. Historian Charles Keil described these early attempts as a “series of tableaux, autonomous units.” It was up to the viewer to knit the narrative together in his or her imagination.

In his book Imaging the Divine: Jesus and Christ Figures in Film (1997), Lloyd Baugh makes a distinction between films that depict the life of Jesus and those that include Jesus as a character. Christ-figures are those characters who do as Jesus did, laying down their lives for others or exhibiting traits that reflect Christ.

Baugh divides Jesus films into categories: classic (King of Kings), musical (Jesus Christ Superstar), scandal (The Last Temptation of Christ) and Pasolini’s masterpiece The Gospel According to St. Matthew.

Lent provides the spiritual environment and opportunity to contemplate images of Jesus in cinema. We may be inspired by the filmmaker’s imagining of Christ or challenged about our knowledge of the Jesus of the Gospels.

Most of the following films are available on DVD and may be appearing on television for Holy Week and Easter.

To continue reading Sr. Rose’s column in the April 2012 issue St. Anthony messenger click here

 

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

See my review: Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

 

Just thought I’d mention that my sister Emilie and I are going to the premiere next week! Will let you know how it goes!

Tree of Life screening in 35mm + panel Jan. 14, 2012, UCLA

War Horse review

Among the many themes that emerge or converge in the films of director, producer, writer Steven Spielberg are lonely children and war, specifically World War II. From the kids in “E.T”: the Extra-Terrestrial” (1982) to the Oscar-winning “Schindler’s List” (1993),  a black and white film but viewers may remember the little Jewish girl in a red coat, waiting for transport to the Nazi death camps. And from “The Color Purple” (1985) for which he deserved an Oscar, to one of my personal favorite’s, this year’s “Super 8”, Spielberg captures lonely children, or children estranged from, or in tension with, their fathers, as none other.

Saving Private Ryan” (1998), and the TV miniseries “Band of Brothers” (2001) and “Pacific” (2010) and back to cinema with “Letters from Iwo Jima” (2006), Spielberg draws the heartbreak of war with the pen of cinematic art as few others, perhaps none other. But I think with “War Horse”, opening in theaters on Christmas Day, is Spielberg’s take on the Academy Award winning 2009 film “The Hurtlocker”, his chance to show how war shreds humanity through the desperate courage and pain of a war horse.

“War Horse” is based on based on a 1982 children’s novel by Michael Marpurgo and has been made into a stage play in 2007 that friends have told me is extremely moving. It is estimated that millions of horses died in World War I from all the armies involved.

A few months before England declared war on Germany in 1914, a horse is born in Devon. Albert Narracott (Jeremy Divine), the only son and of  tenant farmers Ted (Peter Mullan) and Rose (Emily Watson). Ted goes to market to buy a workhorse, presumably a Clydesdale, but is enthralled with the strength and beauty of Joey. He spends money he does not have and takes the horse home, to the derision and disapproval of all except Albert.

Joey proves his worth by plowing an impossibly rocky field but the crop is lost in a rainstorm. When war is declared, soldiers come to the village to buy horses, and an officer promises Albert he will bring Joey home safe if he can.

Joey heads into war with the British soldiers, is lost to the Germans, taken in by a French farmer and his granddaughter but eventually ends up working the German transport lines with Topthorn, a black stallion also captured from the British army.

As the longest, most deadly war in history nears the end, Joey escapes from his cruel masters (though some wranglers were good to the horses) and in a heartbreaking sequence, wrapped in barbed wire, cut and bleeding, makes a run for it through no-mans-land. This is the films’ finest, most poignant, terrifying scene, that culminates with Germans and British units recognizing the transcendent strength of this noble steed, and changing them all, just for a moment.

There are elements of the film that won’t pass muster to the careful viewer. The crop that gets ruined is on a slope; my sister, who has a large garden, said the rain would have run off, not drowned the vegetables.  The crookedly plowed field turns into the perfectly furrowed plot from one scene to another. Albert, who eventually is old enough to go to war, is blinded by gas and then all of a sudden he can see but the audience does not get to see that moment. I wanted to see this because the characters were not well developed; the one with the most interesting potential was Rose, played by Emily Watson.

The film has been nominated for many awards for cinematography, that magical craft of bringing light and camera together, by Janusz Kaminski. Kaminski has worked on many Spielberg movies, winning Oscars for “Schindler’s List” and “Saving Private Ryan”.  But I found the digital color “filming” to be over saturated making the characters seem almost as if they were motion-capture animation. Some of the staging of the scenes seemed to have been lifted right out of “Gone with the Wind” and “The Searchers”.

I think the dissonance I am feeling about the film is the extravagant production quality in 3D vis-à-vis a story that was more simple (as in less complex) than the huge production called for.

In the end, “War Horse” is about war and it is about the ways that animals can teach us to be more human. It’s too long, but it is inspiring. The horses, several were used for both Joey and Topthorn, will astonish you.

Everything in the film is true, and some of it did happen.

 

10 Commandments re-released (the ones by De Mille) for 55th anniversary with new features

 

Paramount released the 55th anniversary edition of “The Ten Commandments” in DVD and Blu-ray today. For my capsule review click here and scroll down.

Did you know that Charlton Heston’s son Fraser played the baby Moses? Son Fraser narrates the new documentary included in the new release – and says he was born just in time to play this key role!

Here’s an interview with Fraser by James Plath Fraser Heston talks about the making of The Ten Commandments

As one of the best movies ever made, if this film is not in your DVD collection, it would make a nice gift for the family.

What I enjoyed was learning how much of the film was shot on location in Egypt – I thought it was all on a sound stage or in the Mojave.

 

Moses with the tablets of the Ten Commandments...

Image via Wikipedia

Rembrand’s Ten Commandments

 

Transformers 3 filming in Chicago

For several days now our Sr Helena has been posting on Facebook (Sr Anne, too) about Transformers being filmed in our back alley and in Chicago… Here is Sr Helena’s short video of the “disaster” in our alley behind 172 N Michigan Ave a couple of days ago…. All media are constructed realities…. Oh, and Sr Helena met Shia Lebeuouf, too!

  • Calendar

    • May 2021
      S M T W T F S
       1
      2345678
      9101112131415
      16171819202122
      23242526272829
      3031  
  • Search